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Mistrial declared in Cherrier trial

Wisconsin roundup: Walker proposes tax credit for Wis. college graduates; more state news stories

Gov. Scott Walker, shown here during a 2018 visit to Hudson, is proposing a new tax credit for college graduates as he campaigns for re-election. File photo

Gov. Scott Walker is proposing a new tax credit for college graduates as he campaigns for re-election.

Walker's so-called “new graduate tax credit” of up to $1,000 per year for up to five years is aimed at keeping college graduates living and working in Wisconsin. This proposal is in addition to Walker's plan to freeze in-state tuition for another four years. The proposed tax credit is featured in a new campaign TV ad.

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Chippewa County residents back home after Tuesday gas leak

A break in a 4-inch gas main Tuesday led to the evacuation of hundreds of people living in the Chippewa County village of Boyd.

Residents were allowed to return home late Tuesday morning. Students at Boyd Elementary School were taken to Stanley Elementary where they were picked up by their parents. It isn't known how many people were evacuated, but Boyd has a population of about 550. We Energies crews reported to the scene and contained the leak.

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Motel guest jabbed by used hypodermic needle left behind in bed

A La Crosse man tells police his son was stuck by a used hypodermic needle which had been left behind in a motel bed.

The incident happened at the Adriatic Motel in La Crosse early Saturday. Police confirmed the man's report that the needle was found under the covers on that bed. The victim was taken to Gundersen Health System for treatment of a puncture wound. A motel employee disposed of the needle.

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Man gets prison for 14th OWI

A Waupaca man is returning to prison after being convicted of his 14th drunk driving offense.

Sixty-four-year-old Daniel Nordell was given a six-year sentence during a Monday appearance in Waupaca County Circuit Court. Investigators say he was arrested after hitting a mailbox, a speed limit sign and a utility pole in Farmington last May. His blood alcohol content was measured at more than double the legal limit. Nordell received a three-year sentence for the same crime in 2006.

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Lack of workers forces Wis. McDonald’s to close early

Big Mac and quarter-pounder dreams were dashed when customers wheeled into the McDonald's restaurant in Muskego Monday night.

There weren't enough workers to cook the chicken nuggets and french fries. A sign reading, "Sorry lobby is closed due to low staff," was placed on one of the doors and the drive-thru was shut down also. Several workers had called that day to say they couldn't come in. Young staff members quitting and students returning to school made it hard to full all the needed positions.

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Texts reveal how Milwaukee health officials worried about lead program

Text messages show former Milwaukee Health Commissioner Bevan Baker was warned about the need for secrecy in the city's lead program.

Major mistakes had been made and Baker was told there would be serious consequences if the public found out. Published reports in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel track the text messages between the commissioner and MHD nursing director Tiffany Barta last September. The agency had accidentally sent a lead-poisoned child from the hospital back to a home filled with lead hazards. The information didn't go public for four months.

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National Guard rescues stranded kayakers near Fond du Lac

Two kayakers who became stranded on the Fond du Lac River are thanking the Wisconsin Army National Guard for their safe rescue.

The two men became disoriented on Sunday and wound up stuck in the river's Eldorado Marsh. Officials say a Wisconsin National Guard Blackhawk helicopter crew contacted officers on the ground and they relayed a message to the kayakers to turn on their cell phones. The two men were spotted a short time later in the dark and a rescue basket was lowered from the chopper to safely pull them out of the marsh.

Crew chiefs said the men were in good spirits, but possibly in the early stages of hypothermia. They were given warm blankets and checked out by paramedics at the airport.

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ACLU involved in school dress-code argument

The American Civil Liberties Union says school bans on yoga pants and leggings are basically sexist in nature.

The Kenosha Unified School District ended its ban on those types of student clothing after five years, but the ACLU of Wisconsin says some staff members didn't get the message. One parent says it is still being selectively enforced. A girl attending summer school at Kenosha Tremper High School was sent home twice for wearing inappropriate clothing — even though the ban is no longer in place.

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